How long should it take to lose weight?

Source: http://www.bodyandsoul.com.au/nutrition/nutrition-tips/how-long-should-it-take-to-lose-weight/news-story/451506479356c096ed10f6093e1c4148

This article initially appeared on news.com.au and has been republished here with permission.

We’re constantly confronted by before and after shots. People who’ve “changed their bodies in six weeks” or “got their pre-baby body back”.

But how long does it really take to lose weight? Here’s the science behind weight loss.

What to expect

If you’ve asked your doctor or trainer “how long does it take to lose weight?”, you may as well have asked how long is a piece of string. There are numerous factors that affect people’s weight loss — from age, fitness, health status to lifestyle.

That said, a realistic rate of weight loss for most people is around 0.5-1kg a week. Weight loss can plateau and yo-yo, so there is no designated time period to ditch that extra layer of fat — despite the common 12-week challenges.

You need to continually mix it up, keep focused and set achievable short and long-term goals.

Weight loss vs fat loss

Seeing the scales flash two kilos in a week doesn’t necessarily mean all your hard work is paying off. There’s three explanations for weight loss: losing body fat, losing water and losing muscle.

With a balanced diet and regular physical activity, you’ll most likely shed fat and preserve lean muscle tissue (ideal world). However, if you’re more focused on your calorie restriction or following the latest fad diet at the expense of exercise, then you’ll lose all three components, but most likely more muscle and water.

This may appear great on the scales, but the results are never long-lived. Why? If you regain the weight, more fat and less muscle is replaced. Then once you come off the “diet”, your body thinks another famine is coming and works hard to store away whatever energy it can — most likely as fat. You are left with a body that jiggles instead of one that is toned.

Age vs fitness age

If you’ve noticed losing weight gets tougher with age, you’re not wrong. As you get older your body loses muscle mass, which slows your base metabolic rate (the rate at which it burns calories).

But that’s not the only age that affects weight loss. Your fitness age — the number of years you’ve been physically active for — determines your base level physique and the speed at which you shed kilos.

If you’re new to training (or overweight) and start exercising 3-4 times a week and eating healthily, then you could lose up to 2 kilos a week. Alternatively, if you’ve been training 3-4 times a week and eating correctly for a while, you’ll probably lose weight a steadier pace.

Get a grip of your lifestyle

Losing weight can be more complex than just eating healthily and exercising. If you’re struggling to shift the scales, consider the role your lifestyle plays. Are you stressed? Not getting enough sleep? Are your friends and family helping you stay on track? Or perhaps you have underlying health issues?

The conclusion

Every body is individual. Not one size fits all. You can train and eat exactly like someone else and have entirely different results.

While most experts would agree that 0.5-1kg a week is realistic, the truth of the matter is that slow and steady wins the race.

Not the message you really want to hear, I know.

Kathleen Alleaume is a nutritionist and exercise physiologist and Author of What’s Eating You?

Taking care of you 

*1.* Any food you consume after 8 P.M. everyday is equally a

poison to your body?
*2.* If you can follow the water therapy for 3 months religiously, your skin, your body and your organs begins to function well?
*3.* Do you know Breakfast is the most important meal of the

day; If you must skip any meal, it shouldn’t be breakfast?
*4.* Do you know too much red meat is very dangerous to your health?
*5.* Do you know people who smile always live longer, look younger and are more healthier than their counter part who does not?
*Listen:*

 You can use the most expensive cream on your body; you can take the best care of your body, but *HONEY* with *BANANA* can make your skin glow, make it look good and make people ask you the kind of cream you are using.
*6.* For every bottle of soft drink you consume, you have just taken 9cubes of sugar, and it takes 7 days for it to wash off your body; men increase their likelihood of having a heart attack by 20 percent.
*7.* Fried meat is a killer; It is damaging your body.
*8.* People who do not take breakfast are going to have a lower blood sugar level.
*9.* Drinking water only when you are thirsty is obtaining a license to damage your liver.
*10.* Holding your urine when you are supposed to let go is

another way you are damaging your liver and kidney.
*11.* Adding salt into your food when it is already served is

another way of slowly poisoning yourself and vital organs?
*12.* Observing the routine of proper eating: Eat BREAKFAST like a KING, LUNCH like a PRINCE and DINNER like a BEGGAR would help you live longer.
Please take care of your health, for HEALTH is WEALTH

Ike Onwubuya

Biomarkers could predict which diets are best for weight loss

Source: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318335.php

Each year, millions of us go on diets in an attempt to lose weight, but not all of us succeed. A new study has uncovered two biomarkers that could predict how effective certain diets will be for weight loss, particularly for people prediabetes or diabetes.

From an analysis of more than 1,200 adults, researchers found that a person’s fasting blood glucose levels, fasting insulin levels, or both, were effective for pinpointing which diets were most likely to lead to weight loss.

Such biomarkers were especially effective for determining which diets were best for people with prediabetes and diabetes, the researchers report.

Study co-author Dr. Arne Astrup, head of the Department of Nutrition at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, and colleagues recently published their findings in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

According to the American Diabetes Association, around 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the condition, wherein the body is unable to effectively use the hormone insulin, causing high blood glucose levels.

Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but they are not high enough to warrant a diabetes diagnosis. However, people with prediabetes are at significantly greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those without prediabetes.

It is estimated that around 86 million people in the U.S. have prediabetes, but around 90 percent are unaware of it.