7 side effects of weight loss pills you didn’t know

Source: http://www.tgdaily.com/health/7-side-effects-of-weight-loss-pills-you-didnt-know

Saibu Baba, 13th November 2017

Diet pills are very commonly used for weight loss. These medicines are also referred to as weight loss pills. Such weight loss pills have been in the market for decades, and many of them are readily available over the counter.
But people hardly know that these weight loss pills, that are hugely advertised, have many side effects, some of them can even cause serious health issues while the overdose of few can be fatal.
Here are some of the more significant side effects, that not everyone is aware of.

◦ Increase in blood pressure is a side effect of the weight loss pills that you might not notice initially, but sustained and prolonged use might increase your blood pressure to dangerous levels. These tablets are not at all recommend, nor safe for the purpose of people with diabetes.

◦ Some of the weight loss pills are introduced to you as dietary supplements. These are not pills but some supplement that is advanced to be substituted for food, to reduce weight. Such supplements do not require FDA approval and might be using unsafe ingredients. Such diet pills or supplements can cause serious health risks.

◦ The weight loss pills have diet stimulants that can increase the chances of cardiac arrest. Diet pills or weight loss pills often tend to use drugs that are dangerous and have side effects of increased blood pressure causing a lot of pressure on your heart, increasing the chances of cardiac arrest.

◦ Most of the times the weight loss pills have certain antidepressants or anti-anxiety drugs which might cause addiction problems. These drugs should not be taken lightly as any over dosage might cause serious health issues apart from creating an addiction to these drugs.

◦ Some of the weight loss pills are based on the formula to block fat by low absorption of food which may cause fall in nutrient absorption in the body as well. While inhibiting general weakness, it can cause many stomach problems like constipation, bloating and acidity.

◦ Dehydration is another side effect of weight loss pills. Many pills are merely a combination of diuretic and caffeine which can cause water loss leading to dehydration.

◦ Nausea and vomiting can be the side effect of your weight loss pill. Yes, the drugs used in such tablets can exhibit the side effect of Nausea and vomiting while prolonged use may cause severe health hazards.

Apart from the above side effects, there are few things that you must know before you start using these pills for weight loss or even recommend one to your friend.
Firstly, take such pills only through a prescription. Although these are available over the counter, yet it saves you consult your physician and choose a safe and recommended dosage.
Secondly, do not trust any TV advert or newspapers reviews on these products they are paid publicity and might not be true.
So, next time you think of an easy way to reduce weight, try not to go very easy on yourself and risk your life with the health issue of pills. Workout, change your diet; improving lifestyle are few things you can start anytime you want to shed some extra kilos.

Culled by Ike Onwubuya

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This Is Why Your Personality Type Might Be Sabotaging Your Weight Loss Goals

This Is Why Your Personality Type Might Be Sabotaging Your Weight Loss Goals

If you’re struggling to shed the pounds, your personality might be to blame.

This-Is-Why-Your-Personality-Type-Might-Be-Sabotaging-Your-Weight-Loss-Goals_267552623_mazur-serhiyMAZUR SERHIY/SHUTTERSTOCK

Your personality can make plenty of things in life much easier, from choosing your shoes to decorating your house. But it can also work against you—especially if you’re trying to lose weight. Although the science behind personality types is sometimes ambiguous, recognizing your tendencies (both good and bad!) might be pivotal to finally slimming down.

That particularly goes for Type A personalities. Type A people are known for being punctual, organized, and competitive with themselves and others. That doesn’t sound so bad, right? But in the long run, these traits can prevent them from achieving their weight loss goals.

Why? The “one-size-fits-all” approach of most workout and diet programs may appeal to the masses, but they often sabotage the goals of Type A personalities. For instance, you might insist on following through on a workout schedule, despite feeling sore and strained. That could lead to a bigger injury later on, derailing your progress altogether. Plus, following a specific workout or diet plan and not seeing immediate results might cause you to give up entirely. (By the way, this is what your favorite workout secretly says about you.)

While it’s helpful to feel committed to a fitness and diet routine, holding yourself to a strict standard may slow your momentum in the long run, according to Stephanie Mansour, a Chicago-based certified personal trainer and weight loss coach. “It’s good to have a plan, but it’s also important to connect with how your body is actually feeling,” she told HuffPost.

That doesn’t mean you have to ditch your plan completely, though. In fact, you can easily use those bothersome Type A personality traits to your advantage. (You can also try these 42 fast, easy tips for weight loss.) Mansour recommends building some flexibility into your own rules. In other words, you can eat that bit of cake or taking a day off from the gym every once in awhile; doing so will actually keep you motivated and avoid burnout later on, she says.

“What’s important is you have some flexibility to adjust the workout so it fits best for you,” according to Mansour. “Think of it as a roadmap, but ultimately you’re driving the car.”

Congrats, Type A’s! Follow this advice, and you’re one step closer to dropping the pounds for good. But once you do, beware of the surprising ways weight loss can change your personality.

[Source: CNNHuffPost]

Here’s what losing weight does to your body and brain

Gene Kim and Jessica Orwig Oct. 29, 2017, 8:00 AM 564,628Special thanks to John Gunstad, professor with the Department of Psychological Sciences at Kent State University, for speaking with us about his cutting-edge research on how losing weight affects brain function. Following is a transcript of the video. 
Here’s what losing weight does to your body and brain.
During the first week, you may find it easy to lose weight by simply switching to a healthier diet. But as your metabolism adjusts, you won’t burn as many calories as you used to.
So losing additional weight will become harder.
Making matters worse, as the fat melts away, you’ll start to experience an increase in appetite. After a meal, fat cells release a hormone called leptin into the bloodstream.
This surge in leptin levels signals to your brain you’re full and should stop eating. But with less overall fat, people who lose weight show a measurable dip in leptin.
Brain scans of obese patients who had lost 10% of their body weight revealed that less leptin leads to increased activity in regions of the brain that control our desire to eat.
The result isn’t just an increased appetite but an even stronger urge to eat fatty, high-calorie foods, because your brain is trying to restore the body’s leptin levels to normal. 
However, fighting that early impulse to gorge on pizza and donuts is worth it in the long run.
Besides the decreased risk of heart disease, hypertension, high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes, scientists studying overweight people discovered that losing just one pound of body weight reduces four pounds of pressure on knee joints.
Losing excess weight also reduces strain on the blood vessels, increases blood flow to the brain, and boosts overall brain function.
Several studies have shown that people who underwent weight-loss surgery saw an improvement in memory, concentration, and problem-solving skills in as soon as three months.
Plus, brain scans indicate that people who lost weight and kept it off for nine months reacted differently when shown images of high-calorie foods than before they lost the weight.
The brain regions that process reward, motivation, and taste didn’t react as strongly, whereas the areas that promote overall self-control had a boost in activity.
So fighting those cravings early on might make them easier to control later. Turns out — like anything else — losing weight can get easier with practice.
Source : http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-lose-weight-brain-body-effects-2017-10?IR=C
Posted by Ike Onwubuya 

Benefits of Black Tea

Source: http://www.byrdie.co.uk/black-tea-benefits

When it comes to boosting metabolism, coffee and matcha have long been the beverages of choice. But according to a new study, black tea is a secret weight-loss hero.

Green tea molecules are small enough to alter energy metabolism in the liver, whereas black tea molecules are too large. However, according to the study published in the European Journal of Nutrition, researchers discovered that black tea polyphenols stimulate the growth of good gut bacteria and the formation of short-chain fatty acids instead, which have been shown to boost metabolic rate.

Both black tea and green tea were proven to lower the number of gut bacteria linked to obesity while increasing the bacteria responsible for lean body mass. But now there is proof that black tea revs up your metabolism too.

“The results suggest that both green and black teas are prebiotics, substances that induce the growth of good microorganisms that contribute to a person’s well-being,” said Susanne Henning, lead author of the study and a human nutrition professor at UCLA.

“Our new findings suggest that black tea, through a specific mechanism through the gut microbiome, may also contribute to good health and weight loss in humans,” she said, adding, “For black tea lovers, there may be a new reason to keep drinking it.”

The best exercise for weight loss, according to science

Source: http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/fitness/weight-loss/the-best-exercise-for-weight-loss-according-to-science/news-story/26d5623a9496264f5cd0e58804675a17

 

THE problem with exercise as a weight loss strategy is many of us use it as a way justify an extra slice of pizza or another glass of wine.

But as it turns out, how hungry you are post workout depends on how intense or how long that workout really was.

recent study published in Journal of Endocrinology recruited 16 healthy, fit young men (sorry, no women due to controlling for the effects of women’s menstrual cycles). Participants were split into two groups: One group focused on intensity, ranging from an easy jog for 55 minutes (50% of their maximum capacity) to a more vigorous pace for 36 minutes (75% of maximum capacity), until they burned around 600 calories.

The second group focused on length with a run for 45 minutes at a steady pace on one day, followed by a run for 90 minutes at the same pace on another day (70% of maximum capacity). Throughout the experiment, both groups ate standard meals and levels of ghrelin — a hormone thought to influence appetite was measured. Generally speaking, when ghrelin levels rise, so does hunger.

Results reveal that our appetites certainly are strange, influenced by many factors beyond hormones and burning calories. In general, exercise lowered ghrelin (making people less hungry) with the effects being more pronounced when runs were vigorous (above 75% maximum capacity) and longer (90 minutes) compared to gentler jogging or briefer runs (45 minutes).

Interestingly, hormones remained suppressed one-hour post workout when workouts were the longest. What’s more, those who ran for 90 minutes reported feeling less hungry compared to those who carried out short, intense workouts, who soon felt peckish, despite still having low levels of ghrelin in their blood.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?

Granted the study was small and did not follow up whether participants had replaced the calories they had burned post workout, but this study shows that some types of exercise may be better than others at blunting appetite and potentially aiding in weight management. That is, you may wish to increase the duration of each session if you want to whittle the waistline.

WHY YOU’RE HUNGRY AFTER A WORKOUT

It’s true that we’re not all the same when it comes to weight loss and there are individual differences in the effect exercise has on appetite. Despite it boiling down to the type of workout you’re doing (intense vs. low-intensity sessions), studies show that the level of fitness also impacts appetite.

In other words, the less fit you are, the more famished you’ll be. That’s because your body and brain haven’t gotten used to your workout habit yet, suggesting that a regular exercise habit might help us to regulate our appetites better.

Another reason is dehydration. Many times our bodies mistake thirst for hunger, so if you’re not drinking enough water throughout your workout, hunger may be intensified.

BOTTOM LINE

Let’s remember exercise has many other benefits irrespective of weight loss: elevated mood, immune boosting, reduced blood pressure, and improved fitness, to name a few.

Current Australian physical activity guidelines recommend 150-300 minutes of “moderate” intensity physical activity or 75-150 minutes of “vigorous” activity a week.

Australians are nowhere near active enough, and for someone trying to keep their weight in check, guidelines recommend adults increase to 300 minutes (five hours) or 60 minutes of moderate intensity activity on most days of the week.

Kathleen Alleaume is an exercise and nutrition scientist and author of What’s Eating You?

How long should it take to lose weight?

Source: http://www.bodyandsoul.com.au/nutrition/nutrition-tips/how-long-should-it-take-to-lose-weight/news-story/451506479356c096ed10f6093e1c4148

This article initially appeared on news.com.au and has been republished here with permission.

We’re constantly confronted by before and after shots. People who’ve “changed their bodies in six weeks” or “got their pre-baby body back”.

But how long does it really take to lose weight? Here’s the science behind weight loss.

What to expect

If you’ve asked your doctor or trainer “how long does it take to lose weight?”, you may as well have asked how long is a piece of string. There are numerous factors that affect people’s weight loss — from age, fitness, health status to lifestyle.

That said, a realistic rate of weight loss for most people is around 0.5-1kg a week. Weight loss can plateau and yo-yo, so there is no designated time period to ditch that extra layer of fat — despite the common 12-week challenges.

You need to continually mix it up, keep focused and set achievable short and long-term goals.

Weight loss vs fat loss

Seeing the scales flash two kilos in a week doesn’t necessarily mean all your hard work is paying off. There’s three explanations for weight loss: losing body fat, losing water and losing muscle.

With a balanced diet and regular physical activity, you’ll most likely shed fat and preserve lean muscle tissue (ideal world). However, if you’re more focused on your calorie restriction or following the latest fad diet at the expense of exercise, then you’ll lose all three components, but most likely more muscle and water.

This may appear great on the scales, but the results are never long-lived. Why? If you regain the weight, more fat and less muscle is replaced. Then once you come off the “diet”, your body thinks another famine is coming and works hard to store away whatever energy it can — most likely as fat. You are left with a body that jiggles instead of one that is toned.

Age vs fitness age

If you’ve noticed losing weight gets tougher with age, you’re not wrong. As you get older your body loses muscle mass, which slows your base metabolic rate (the rate at which it burns calories).

But that’s not the only age that affects weight loss. Your fitness age — the number of years you’ve been physically active for — determines your base level physique and the speed at which you shed kilos.

If you’re new to training (or overweight) and start exercising 3-4 times a week and eating healthily, then you could lose up to 2 kilos a week. Alternatively, if you’ve been training 3-4 times a week and eating correctly for a while, you’ll probably lose weight a steadier pace.

Get a grip of your lifestyle

Losing weight can be more complex than just eating healthily and exercising. If you’re struggling to shift the scales, consider the role your lifestyle plays. Are you stressed? Not getting enough sleep? Are your friends and family helping you stay on track? Or perhaps you have underlying health issues?

The conclusion

Every body is individual. Not one size fits all. You can train and eat exactly like someone else and have entirely different results.

While most experts would agree that 0.5-1kg a week is realistic, the truth of the matter is that slow and steady wins the race.

Not the message you really want to hear, I know.

Kathleen Alleaume is a nutritionist and exercise physiologist and Author of What’s Eating You?

Biomarkers could predict which diets are best for weight loss

Source: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318335.php

Each year, millions of us go on diets in an attempt to lose weight, but not all of us succeed. A new study has uncovered two biomarkers that could predict how effective certain diets will be for weight loss, particularly for people prediabetes or diabetes.

From an analysis of more than 1,200 adults, researchers found that a person’s fasting blood glucose levels, fasting insulin levels, or both, were effective for pinpointing which diets were most likely to lead to weight loss.

Such biomarkers were especially effective for determining which diets were best for people with prediabetes and diabetes, the researchers report.

Study co-author Dr. Arne Astrup, head of the Department of Nutrition at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, and colleagues recently published their findings in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

According to the American Diabetes Association, around 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the condition, wherein the body is unable to effectively use the hormone insulin, causing high blood glucose levels.

Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but they are not high enough to warrant a diabetes diagnosis. However, people with prediabetes are at significantly greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those without prediabetes.

It is estimated that around 86 million people in the U.S. have prediabetes, but around 90 percent are unaware of it.